Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ) Adolescents

Several studies have been conducted on the sexual behavior of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) adolescents. This section includes information on LGBTQ adolescents’ sexual behavior, use of condoms, and likelihood to get tested for STDs including HIV.

Sexual Intercourse, Abuse, and Pregnancy Among Adolescent Women: Does Sexual Orientation Make a Difference?

Source: Elizabeth Saewyc, et al, “Sexual Intercourse, Abuse, and Pregnancy Among Adolescent Women: Does Sexual Orientation Make a Difference?” Family Planning Perspectives, 31.3 (May/June 1999).

Description:

This article reports the findings of a study to determine whether sexual orientation affects adolescent sexual behavior and the related risk factors. The study compared sexual behavior of heterosexual-identified adolescents to lesbian, bisexual and questioning-identified adolescents.

Key Statistics:

  • Bisexual or lesbian respondents were about as likely as heterosexual women ever to have had vaginal intercourse, but they had a significantly higher prevalence of pregnancy and physical or sexual abuse than heterosexual or unsure adolescents.
  • Bisexual or lesbian respondents were the most likely to have frequent intercourse.
  • Providers of reproductive health care and family planning services should not assume that pregnant teenagers are heterosexual or that adolescents who say they are bisexual, lesbian or unsure of their sexual orientation are not in need of family planning counseling.

To View this Resource:www.guttmacher.org/pubs/journals/3112799.html


Among Sexually Experienced Male Adolescents, Those with Partners of Both Sexes Exhibit Riskiest Behavior

Source: T. Lane, “Among Sexually Experienced Male Adolescents, Those with Partners of Both Sexes Exhibit Riskiest Behavior,” Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 34.3 (May/June 2002).

Description: This article reports the findings of a study to determine whether sexual orientation affects adolescent sexual behavior and the related risk factors. The study compared sexual behavior of adolescent males with only heterosexual sexual contact to adolescent males with partners of both sexes.

Key Statistics:

  • Male adolescents who have sexual contact with both males and females are more likely to report AIDS-related risk factors and a history of sexually transmitted disease than are males who have sexual contact only with females.
  • Among young men progressing to sexual intercourse, those with partners of both sexes have reduced odds of using a condom and elevated odds of having had multiple lifetime partners.
  • In contrast, men who have exclusively homosexual relationships are no more likely than heterosexually active men to report these AIDS-related risk factors.
  • Bisexually active young men deserve specific attention in prevention programs.

To View this Resource:www.guttmacher.org/pubs/journals/3416602.html


Prevalence of Unprotected Sex and HIV-Antibody Testing Among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youth

Source: Shira Maguen and Lisa Armistead, “Prevalence of Unprotected Sex and HIV-Antibody Testing Among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youth,” Journal of Sex Research, 37.2 (May 2000):169-174.

Description: This article contains the findings of a study to examine the relationship between sexual risk behavior and HIV testing. The study was conducted on a group of Southern lesbian, gay, and bisexual-identified adolescents.

Key Statistics:

  • In 2000, adolescents ages 13–21 accounted for 25% of newly reported HIV infections.
  • In 2000, two adolescents under the age of 21 become infected with HIV every hour.
  • Gay and bisexual male adolescents are particularly at risk: In New York City, 9% of gay and bisexual men ages 18–24 were HIV positive, in San Francisco 17.9% of gay and bisexual men ages 18–24 were HIV, and in Houston 10% of men who have sex with males were HIV positive as of 2000.
  • In a sample that included gay, lesbian, and bisexual adolescents, less than 40% of the population had been tested for HIV.
  • Adolescents prefer to be tested for HIV in a clinic that conducts only HIV-testing as opposed to a regular doctor’s office or a hospital.
  • Over one third of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender adolescents studied reported unprotected anal sex and almost one third reported unprotected vaginal sex.

This article may be obtained online for a fee. For more information:
* See the Journal of Sex Research online at: www.sexscience.org/publications/index.php?category_id=439 , or
* Contact your local librarian.

If you have difficulty finding this book, you may contact SIECUS at www.siecus.org/feedback.html.


Predictors of Risky Sexual Behavior Among Young African American Men Who Have Sex with Men

Source: Trevor Hart, et al, “Predictors of Risky Sexual Behavior Among Young African American Men Who Have Sex with Men,” American Journal of Public Health, 94.7 (July 2004):1122-1124.

Description: This article contains the findings of a study to examine the relationship between risky sexual behavior and HIV infection among adolescent African-American men who have sex with men.

Key Statistics:

  • 26 % of adolescents studied engaged in unprotected anal intercourse.
  • Not carrying condoms and low peer norms were associated with increased likelihood of unprotected receptive anal intercourse.
  • Age, educational level, employment status, and sexual identity did not predict unprotected receptive anal intercourse.

This article may be obtained online for a fee. For more information:
* See the American Journal of Public Health online at: www.ajph.org, or
* Contact your local librarian.

If you have difficulty finding this book, you may contact SIECUS at
www.siecus.org/feedback.html.


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