Factors That Affect Condom Use

This section contains information on factors that affect condom use, including the impact of parental discussions about condoms and a survey to determine unmarried women’s motivations for using condoms.

Patterns of Condom-Use among Adolescents: The Impact of Mother-Adolescent Communication

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Patterns of Condom-Use among Adolescents: The Impact of Mother-Adolescent Communication,” The American Journal of Public Health (October 1998).

Description: This article presents the findings of a study to determine the impact of mother-adolescent discussions on adolescent sexual behavior. The study was conducted with sexually active adolescents ages 14–17.

Key Statistics:

  • Frank discussions between mothers and their adolescents about condoms can lead teens to adopt behaviors that will prevent them from becoming infected with HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Timing of discussions is critical; Condom use increased only among teens whose mothers talked to them about condoms before their first sexual encounter.
  • Teens who used condoms at first intercourse were 20 times more likely to use condoms in subsequent acts.

To View this Resource click here: www.cdc.gov/nchstp/dstd/Condom_Use_Among_Adolescents.htm


Condom Use for Disease Prevention among Unmarried U.S. Women

Source: John E. Anderson, et al, “Condom Use for Disease Prevention among Unmarried U.S. Women,” Family Planning Perspectives 28.1 (January/February 1996).

Description: This report contains the findings of a study to determine why unmarried U.S. women choose to use condoms.

Key Statistics: 

  • 41% of women reported using condoms for protection against sexually transmitted diseases, and 30% said they used condoms for this reason every time or most times they had intercourse.
  • Condom use for disease prevention appeared most common among young women, never-married women, those with the highest incomes, women at an early stage of their reproductive career, women who had not been surgically sterilized and were not using oral contraceptives, those who believed in the effectiveness of condoms, and women who had intercourse infrequently.

To View this Resource click here: www.guttmacher.org/pubs/journals/2802596.html

 


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